Sunday, April 26, 2009

Exercise & Nutrition for Fibromyalgia & Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

The Benefits & How to Get Started With Water Exercise

By Adrienne Dellwo, About.com
Updated: January 19, 2009

When you start an exercise routine for fibromyalgia6 (FMS), the type of exercise you choose can make a big difference.

Numerous studies over the years have consistently shown that warm-water exercise can help people with FMS:
Improve pain threshold
Reduce tender point count
Reduce pain
Boost cognitive function
Lessen anxiety and depression
Perceive their condition as less severe

Studies also show that people with FMS are able to tolerate warm-water exercise better than some other forms of exercise.
To continue with this article please click here

http://chronicfatigue.about.com/od/treatingfmscfs/a/warmwaterFMS.htm?p=1
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Exercise as Part of a Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & Fibromyalgia Treatment Regimen
Feeling Better vs. Feeling Worse

Updated: January 19, 2009

When you have fibromyalgia6 (FMS) or chronic fatigue syndrome7 (CFS or ME/CFS8), it's common for well-meaning people to tell you something like, "If you'd just exercise more, you'd feel better."

Certainly, exercise is important to anyone who wants to be healthy, but it poses special problems for anyone with these conditions. Even moderate exertion can make you feel worse, so it can be very tempting to give up exercise altogether.

To continue with this article please click here
http://chronicfatigue.about.com/od/treatingfmscfs/a/exercise.htm?p=1
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Why can't people with chronic fatigue syndrome exercise for an energy boost?

By Adrienne Dellwo, About.com

Updated: July 8, 2008

Question: Why can't people with chronic fatigue syndrome exercise for an energy boost?

When most people are tired, exercising can help give them a boost of energy. Wouldn't people with chronic fatigue syndrome feel better if they just got more exercise?
Answer:

While it seems logical that they would, the answer is no. That's because of the key chronic fatigue syndrome symptom: postexertional malaise.

After exercising, postexertional malaise is an intensifying fatigue that heightens other symptoms in people with chronic fatigue syndrome. Exertion actually makes chronic fatigue sufferers feel worse and have less energy.

To continue with this article please click here
http://chronicfatigue.about.com/od/faqsfactsheets/f/cfs_exercise.htm?p=1
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Exercise & Nutrition for Fibromyalgia & Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Exercise and nutrition for fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome are important parts of symptom management. Learn how to control symptoms through your diet, with vitamins and supplements, and the right kinds of exercise.

To continue with this article please click here
http://chronicfatigue.about.com/od/exercisenutrition/Exercise_Nutrition_for_Fibromyalgia_Chronic_Fatigue_Syndrome.htm

9 comments:

LisaShaw said...

Michelle are you familiar with Kimberly from The Child of the King blog? She has Fibromyalgia and is using a seabiotic (?) I could be wrong on the name. I am not familiar with the subject matter but you both have supplied great information for people who need it. Thanks for always being a blessing.

I pray that you and your family are doing well. May God's peace and healing touch be upon all who need it. Love you.

Hi! I'm Grace said...

These are great information, Michelle.
Have a blessed Sunday!

Denise said...

Such helpful information, love you.

Femin Susan said...

thanks for those helpful information.
cheers!

He And Me + 3 said...

I will have to pass this on to my aunt...she has FMS

Alleluiabelle said...

Thank you so much Michele for this information. I have saved all of it in my favorites. I have Fibromyalgia as you know, and I will be meeting with my Rheumatologist tomorrow at 1:15. He is about an hour and a half drive away from where I live. Please keep me in your prayers for this visit. He had me on Forteo shots last year for my bones, and I would like to go back on them to try it again. The outer left side of my leg where the groin is is really aching bad and I can't lay on my left side at all at night. He usually gives me a cortisone shot to temporarily help with that and they are painful. I didn't know about the warm water exercise therapy, that's something I'm going to ask him about as well.

Again, thank you so much for all of this information especially today before I meet with my doctor tomorrow.

Love you bunches,
Alleluiabelle

luvmy4sons said...

As always such a great source of information. I know that each person must find their own answers by listening to their own bodies and seeking wisdom from God. I have found daily exercise to be invaluable to me in controlling my fibromyalgia. And as you know eating as many LIVE foods has proven invaluable to me for decreasing pain and inflammation and raising energy levels-a direct answer to my prayer for guidance and healing. I do think that sometimes a new regimen is difficult at first but if you stick with it you find that it gets easier and the benefits start to show up. I pray each person who reads here today be prompted by the Great Physician to do what it is that will help them the most with these diseases. Blessings to you!

Amanda said...

This is some really great information!!!

I am here because someone has nominated you for an Awesome Blog 2009 Award! Stop by and see waht category someone thought you rocked!!

http://awesomestblogs2009.blogspot.com/

God bless-
Amanda

Pacific Northwest said...

I am writing to you from the Pacific Northwest Foundation about a case study that may be of interest to your research into fibromyalgia. While this was not a study undertaken by the Foundation, it was a case with which we have had access to in virtually every detail. This includes the chart notes (with the patient's approval) as well as the observations and insights of the patient's health care provider.

The case involves an adult female who had been disabled for eight years with diagnosed fibromyalgia. Within four months of treatment, she was able to backpack, regularly work a full day and have little or no pain.

As with all our studies, it is our hope to stimulate additional efforts to determine if these results were an aberration or have wider implications. To this end, we wanted to make you aware of the cast study (which can be found online at http://pnf.org/html/fibromyalgia.html), in the hope that it might prove useful as a starting point for research within your organization.

Thanks and kind regards,

Frank Cook
Pacific Northwest Foundation